Category Archives: Photography basics

Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter

Ladies’ Snowboard Halfpipe - Sochi 2014

Torah Bright (AUS) competes in the Finals of the Ladies’ Snowboard Halfpipe at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

Open your visual journal for our critique session, add the work of a student who you are providing a critique and answer the following questions.

DESCRIPTION:

Just the facts. Describe the image using terms related to fast shutter, composition, and elements of art (line, shape, form, color, texture, value).

  • What do you see?
  • No opinions here.

ANALYSIS:

Tell how your descriptive observation answers relate to each other. How are elements and composition organized? Think about the principles of art (rhythm, balance, repetition, contrast, movement, emphasis).
Which Principles are being used and how?

INTERPRETATION:

How does this piece make you feel? What does it remind you of? What do you think the artist trying to communicate about the subject?

Don’t include opinions yet about quality or success.

JUDGEMENT:

Is this piece successful or not? Is it original or not? Is the image sharp, well exposed and interesting to look at? What is your gut feeling about the visual idea when you first looked at it? What do propose the artist does differently?

This is the place for opinions.

 

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Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter

Learning Targets:

  • I can adjust the time of a DSLR focal plane shutter to 1/500th of a second or faster.
  • I can produce a 5 well exposed and sharply focused stop motion photographs with interesting composition using a fast shutter speed by the end of the class period today.

Exposure: 1/1600 sec. f/2.8; ISO 3200; Manual mode

Beijing Olympics
Jason Donald (USA) breaks his bat as he get an RBI single during a men’s semifinal baseball game against Cuba. August 22, 2008.© Troy Wayrynen/NewSport

Make at least 5 or more photographs today demonstrating how to control a DSLR shutter to provide a fast shutter speed to produce a dynamic stop motion image. Remember you need to control the shutter of a DSLR camera using the manual setting (M mode). The faster the shutter moves the more stopping capacity you have to freeze action.

Start with 1/500th sec. and move up to 1/100th sec. What about 1/2000th sec.?

Image result for canon t5i camera meterImage result for canon t5i camera meter

Remember to watch your camera’s exposure meter for proper exposure. Also, select the maximum lens aperture to help you achieve proper exposure with the highest shutter speed possible depending on available light.

Image result for camera isoISO will also help you achieve the required results. The higher you go with the camera’s ISO the more sensitive the camera image sensor becomes giving you more light capturing potential, which translates to higher shutter speeds.

Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter

Last week you learned how to use a slow shutter and different techniques, such as painting with light, panning and ghosting, to produce interesting visual images. This week will be the opposite. You will shorten the shutter speed of the camera to capture fast moving subjects and freeze action.

R.R_shutterLearning Targets:

  • I can adjust the time of a DSLR focal plane shutter to 1/500th of a second or faster.
  • I can produce a 5 well exposed and sharply focused stop motion photographs with interesting composition using a fast shutter speed (due Wednesday 3/13 for critique).

The Photo Challenge this week is called Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter. You will make two photographs to start out the week demonstrating how to control a DSLR shutter to provide a fast shutter speed to produce a dynamic stop motion image. Remember you need to control the shutter of a DSLR camera using the manual setting (M mode). The faster the shutter moves the more stopping capacity you have to freeze action.

cm_fastshutter-9546Before you go out you will need to have an action plan written at your visual journal and a sketch depicting what you want to photograph (pre-visualize what you want to do).

Additionally, you will need to demonstrate to Mr. Wayrynen how to set a DSLR camera to the following settings:

  • Shutter: 1/500th of second
  • Aperture: f/3.5
  • ISO: 1600

 

My sketch and idea is to go out with a partner and photograph my partnher from a low angle jump, or leaping int he air.

Exposure Triangle – Aperture

Questions: Describe the difference in each of your pictures when adjusting the shutter speed of your camera from 1/15th, 1/60th, 1/125, and 1/500th.

Did you achieve a proper exposure (too light too dark)? Good image sharpness?

Add four pictures to your visual journal showing a difference in each picture depending on the shutter speeds you selected.

Learning Target:

  • I can adjust the aperture control of a DSLR camera and make five photographs using five different aperture settings.
  • I can post my pictures to my visual journal and reflect on what I see happening with the different aperture settings. Describe what you learned.

aperture-sequence-2

Process:

  • Set the camera mode dial to Av (aperture priority) and use a 55mm focal length.
  • Go to a relatively bright location and photograph a subject (like flowers) with a consistent background. Use rule of thirds! Outside should work well.
  • Set the camera ISO to 400 or 800 depending on the amount of light available.
  • Take four pictures at four different aperture settings (f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16 and f/22)
  • Import your pictures using Adobe Lightroom and add them to your visual journal. Describe what you see. Which aperture setting provides the most depth of field? The least?

Photo Challenge – Exposure Triangle

Learning targets:

  • I can complete an Exposure Triangle pre-assessment
  • I can use my computer as a research tool to look up what an exposure triangle is and record my research finding at my visual journal. Show photographic examples.
  • I can test my knowledge about the exposure triangle using an exposure simulator.

Notes:

You will need to log in to your school district Google drive account to access the Google form.

T5i viewfinder meter

Making sure your simulated pictures are not too dark or too light answer the questions using your visual journal:

What does it mean to have a proper exposure?

What is the minimum shutter speed you need to stop the moving propeller?

What shutter speed creates a sense of movement in the propeller?

What is the best f/stop to use to get maximum Depth of Field (the most sharpness in the foreground and background)?

What is the visual difference in image quality between ISO 100 and ISO 25600?

What does the acronym ISO mean?

What does the ISO control inside the camera when you adjust it?

Respond to the questions and show your exposure captures from the simulator using your visual journal by the end of class today please.

mlk schedule

 

Digital Photography 1

“It is always the instantaneous reaction to oneself that produces a photograph.”

– Robert Frank

Image result for robert frank

What does this photograph, made by photographer Robert Frank, communicate to you?

Today’s activities:

  • Photograph a partner

Learning objectives:

  • I can make 5 photographs of a partner
  • I can import my pictures to my computer using Lightroom
  • I can crop, adjust color, add contrast, adjust exposure and further refine my pictures
  • I can select my favorite single image using Lightroom’s rating feature

Photo Challenges

Vote for the best example of shadows and light images:

Period 3

Period 5

Silhouette Studio Photography

Think of a concept for your silhouette photos and then take photos of back lit subjects to make high contrast silhouettes. You can edit them in Photoshop to give them more blacks and whites, and contrast. Use a couple of studio lights aimed at the background and turn the studio light off to get maximum contrast in your subject. Expose for the background. Name your final photo lastname_silhouette.jpg Turn in on separately from your visual journal.

IMG_9587

Candid Moments with Captions (3-5 photographs with captions)

To get you started look at the work of photographer Henri Cartier Bresson, who coined the phrase “decisive moment.” On your visual journal post 2-3 of his photographs and write a paragraph about his work including your thoughts about his timing, composition and ability to capture the perfect moment.

Now photograph 3-5 candid moments of your own and edit your images using Lightroom. Write a caption for each photo you post to your visual journal including who, what, when, where and why. Include technical camera info for each photo.

IMG_9667

What is your color?

Create a Photoshop Collage 9×12 inches in either landscape or portrait orientation at 300 dpi representing your favorite color. Include a photo of yourself, the color you select and a text layer describing why the color you selected is your color. Post your final image to your visual journal.

Sofia