Category Archives: Exposure Triangle

Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter

Using a fast shutter on a camera allows photographers to stop decisive moments. Capturing life in a split second allows viewers to take a moment to reflect and see the many facets of life

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An Osprey pulls a fish from the Columbia river during an early Spring morning. Photograph by Troy Wayrynen

Taking into consideration the critique work you did yesterday go out and continue to explore fast shutter speeds. Refine your brainstorming ideas from Monday and shooting experiences from Tuesday to improve your technique and composition.

You may go out with the same partner or someone different. Shoot at least 5 pictures, either a sequence, or a series of photographs playing off multiple ideas. Use props if you have them!

A fast shutter speed photograph and a link to your visual journal is due tomorrow by the end of the school day. Name your file lastname_fastshutter.jpg

 

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Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter

Learning Targets:

  • I can adjust the time of a DSLR focal plane shutter to 1/500th of a second or faster.
  • I can produce a 5 well exposed and sharply focused stop motion photographs with interesting composition using a fast shutter speed by the end of the class period today.

Exposure: 1/1600 sec. f/2.8; ISO 3200; Manual mode

Beijing Olympics
Jason Donald (USA) breaks his bat as he get an RBI single during a men’s semifinal baseball game against Cuba. August 22, 2008.© Troy Wayrynen/NewSport

Make at least 5 or more photographs today demonstrating how to control a DSLR shutter to provide a fast shutter speed to produce a dynamic stop motion image. Remember you need to control the shutter of a DSLR camera using the manual setting (M mode). The faster the shutter moves the more stopping capacity you have to freeze action.

Start with 1/500th sec. and move up to 1/100th sec. What about 1/2000th sec.?

Image result for canon t5i camera meterImage result for canon t5i camera meter

Remember to watch your camera’s exposure meter for proper exposure. Also, select the maximum lens aperture to help you achieve proper exposure with the highest shutter speed possible depending on available light.

Image result for camera isoISO will also help you achieve the required results. The higher you go with the camera’s ISO the more sensitive the camera image sensor becomes giving you more light capturing potential, which translates to higher shutter speeds.

Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter

Last week you learned how to use a slow shutter and different techniques, such as painting with light, panning and ghosting, to produce interesting visual images. This week will be the opposite. You will shorten the shutter speed of the camera to capture fast moving subjects and freeze action.

R.R_shutterLearning Targets:

  • I can adjust the time of a DSLR focal plane shutter to 1/500th of a second or faster.
  • I can produce a 5 well exposed and sharply focused stop motion photographs with interesting composition using a fast shutter speed (due Wednesday 3/13 for critique).

The Photo Challenge this week is called Exposure Triangle – Fast Shutter. You will make two photographs to start out the week demonstrating how to control a DSLR shutter to provide a fast shutter speed to produce a dynamic stop motion image. Remember you need to control the shutter of a DSLR camera using the manual setting (M mode). The faster the shutter moves the more stopping capacity you have to freeze action.

cm_fastshutter-9546Before you go out you will need to have an action plan written at your visual journal and a sketch depicting what you want to photograph (pre-visualize what you want to do).

Additionally, you will need to demonstrate to Mr. Wayrynen how to set a DSLR camera to the following settings:

  • Shutter: 1/500th of second
  • Aperture: f/3.5
  • ISO: 1600

 

My sketch and idea is to go out with a partner and photograph my partnher from a low angle jump, or leaping int he air.

Exposure Triangle

Today you will add to your visual journal sequences of photographs showing your work and understanding of the exposure triangle. If you weren’t here on a day the class went out to shoot pictures, or need to re-shoot a sequence you may check out a camera. All students will take an Exposure Triangle Post-Assessment tomorrow.

A sequence looks something like this:

Shutter speed – Which shutter speed is best at stopping movement?

shutter_speed_illustration

Aperture – Which aperture setting provides the most depth of field?

aperture-sequence-2

ISO – Which ISO has the least amount of image noise?

Use-Your-Digital-Camera's-ISO-Setting-Step-1

All links are due by the end of class today at the Google classroom assignment Exposure Triangle.

Exposure Triangle – ISO

Questions: Describe how you format an SD card using our DSLR cameras? What does AWB mean?

Learning Target:

  • I can adjust the ISO control of a DSLR camera and make five photographs using five different ISO settings.
  • I can post my pictures to my visual journal and reflect on what I see happening. What do you see differently about each picture? Describe what you learned.

Use-Your-Digital-Camera's-ISO-Setting-Step-1

Process:

  • Set the camera mode dial to Av (aperture priority) and use a 55mm focal length.
  • Go to a relatively bright location and photograph a subject close up. A location outside will work well.
  • Adjust the camera ISO from 100 to 6400.
  • Import your pictures using Adobe Lightroom and add them to your visual journal. Describe what you see different about each picture. Zoom in to each picture with Lightroom. Which picture has the least amount of noise? The most image noise? Do the colors and contrast of the images look the same?

Turn in your visual journal link to the Google classroom assignment Exposure Triangle at the end of the period. Remember to publish your work and view it before copying your link. You will be graded on the completeness of your Exposure Triangle research and how many Exposure Triangle assignments you completed and published to your visual journal.

Exposure Triangle – ISO

Questions: What differences do you see between the foreground and background of your photographs when shooting a picture at at f/5.6 versus f/22?

What do photographers call this effect created by adjusting the aperture?

Before continuing let’s review how to work with Lightroom and WordPress and cover basic use and buttons of a DSLR camera.

Learning Target:

  • I can adjust the ISO control of a DSLR camera and make five photographs using five different ISO settings.
  • I can post my pictures to my visual journal and reflect on what I see happening. What do you see differently about each picture? Describe what you learned.

Use-Your-Digital-Camera's-ISO-Setting-Step-1

Process:

  • Set the camera mode dial to Av (aperture priority) and use a 55mm focal length.
  • Go to a relatively bright location and photograph a subject (like flowers) with a consistent background. Use rule of thirds! Outside should work well.
  • Adjust the camera ISO from 100 to 3200 using a consistent subject, like flowers.
  • Import your pictures using Adobe Lightroom and add them to your visual journal. Describe what you see different about each picture. Zoom in to each picture with Lightroom. Which picture has the least amount of noise? The most image noise? Do the colors and contrast of the images look the same?

Turn in your visual journal link to the Google classroom assignment Exposure Triangle at the end of the period. Remember to publish your work and view it before copying your link. You will be graded on the completeness of your Exposure Triangle research and how many Exposure Triangle assignments you completed during the week and published to your visual journal.